McIntosh, Houchins

McIntosh, Houchins

MOULTRIE — Mary Cathryn McIntosh and Lawrence Palmer Houchins were united in marriage at 6:30 p.m., on Sept. 17, 2011, at First United Methodist Church in Moultrie.
The bride’s parents are Mr. and Mrs. William McLeod McIntosh of Moultrie. The bridegroom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Lemuel Lawrence Houchins Jr. of Jackson, Miss.
The bride is the granddaughter of Mrs. Hugh Giles Cheek of Butler, Ga., and the groom’s grandparents are Mr. and Mrs. David Maurice Palmer of Corinth, Miss.
The Rev. Marion Ronnie Wills of Thomasville, Ga., performed the candlelight ceremony. A program of music was performed by organist Jane N. Tucker and a string quartet from the Albany Symphony Orchestra.
The church’s entrance railings were festooned with garlands of white roses, hydrangeas, freesias, asparagus ferns, and smilax vines. Large topiaries of white hydrangeas, roses, and freesias in classic stone urns graced the church doors. Inside the sanctuary, candles honored the memory of the groom’s brother, Peyton Hovious Houchins. Flowers for the ceremony celebrated the memory of grandparents Hugh Giles Cheek, Mr. and Mrs. Lemuel Lawrence Houchins, Mr. and Mrs. Tillman Mahoney McIntosh, and Grizelda Green Palmer.
Family and guest pews were adorned with white and blue hydrangeas, white roses, and freesias. Centered in the choir loft was an arrangement of white hybrid delphiniums, snapdragons, hydrangeas, garden roses, Fuji mums, dendrobium orchids, dianthuses, lisianthuses, bells of Ireland, and native Southern foliages in a sculptured white garden urn. Smaller complementary arrangements, Boston ferns, and majestic palms completed the garden-like setting. Wrought iron candelabras holding lighted ivory pillar candles were placed throughout the choir loft. In the stained glass windows were Gothic tree branch candelabras with ivory pillar candles accented with native magnolia foliage, Italian ruscus, and smilax.
Given in marriage by her father, the bride wore a couture pearl gown designed personally for her by Anne Barge. The gown featured an Italian Alençon lace bodice with a sweetheart neckline and lace cap sleeves. It was accented at the natural waist with a floor-length latte satin sash appliquéd with lace. The triple-layered asymmetrical tulle skirt featured Alençon lace appliqués and horsehair trim. Lace covered buttons, a gift from Anne Barge, extended down the back of the gown. She wore her mother’s cathedral-length mantilla veil of ivory silk illusion bordered and appliquéd with Alençon lace. The bride wore diamond and pearl earrings, a gift from Dr. and Mrs. Thomas Lane Estes. Her sixpence was given to her by Mrs. Ed F. Willis.
She carried a clutch bouquet of David Austin garden roses, lily of the valley, and white hydrangeas and freesias wrapped with dupioni silk ribbon and embellished with a tiny crystal bluebird loaned by Mrs. William G. Fallin.
Lenora Jane Estes of New York, N.Y., was maid of honor. The bridesmaids were Elizabeth Burchfield Ballard of New York, N.Y.; Holly Anne Cheek of Atlanta, Ga.; Aubree Pollard Holmes of Malibu, Calif.; Susan Lee McGlaun of Griffin, Ga.; Elizabeth Marie Murray of New York, N.Y.; Katelyn Marie Roebuck of Oxford, Miss; Kay Elizabeth Rogers of Atlanta, Ga.; Cathryn Anne Speyer of Madison, Ga.; and Alice Callahan Thompson of New York, N.Y. The flower girl was Lindsay Cathryn Johnson of Columbia, S.C.
Attendants wore Newport navy, strapless, silk chiffon gowns that featured sweetheart necklines, Grecian-inspired draped bodices, and flowing full-length skirts. They carried hand-tied bouquets of David Austin roses and white and blue hydrangeas caged with natural vines and twigs, wrapped with silk ribbon.
The bridegroom’s father, Lemuel Lawrence Houchins Jr., was best man. The groomsmen were Michael Brooks Blair of Chattanooga, Tenn.; Ray Baker Cannada of Birmingham, Ala.; John Ronald Fry Ill of Nashville, Tenn.; Benjamin Laird Hammond of Berlin, Germany; James David Hobbs of New York, N.Y.; James Wilson Hood of Jackson, Miss.; William McLeod McIntosh Jr. of Oxford, Miss.; James Campbell Watts Jr. of Santa Rosa Beach, Fla.; and Thomas Calvin Wells Jr. of Birmingham, Ala. The ushers were John Bradley Allen of Chattanooga, Tenn.; Thomas Lane Estes Jr. of Winston-Salem, N.C.; Ben Griffin Long of Oxford, Miss.; and David Patrick Palmer of Oxford, Miss. The ring bearer was Clark Leland Carmichiel of Oxford, Miss.
Following the ceremony, the bride’s parents hosted a reception at Sunset Country Club. The club’s entrance was enhanced with large matching arrangements of blue and white hydrangeas, bells of Ireland, white garden roses, blue and white delphiniums, seeded eucalyptus, Italian ruscus, and hanging amaranthus in black wrought iron urns placed on columns. Swags of similar flowers, hung with silk ribbons, adorned the club’s front doors.
The bride’s cake was placed on a round table draped in white dupioni raw silk and overlaid with a silk, leaf-embroidered chiffon square with satin banding. The cake was centered atop a silver plateau. The seven-tiered confection seemed to be a vision of soft elegance, the ivory butter cream knifed only slightly to show texture. Two small clusters of sugar-crafted lilies and orchids accented the base and shoulder of the cake, and a delicate sugar flower bouquet crowned the top. Guests chose from six different layer flavors: almond, kahlua marble, chocolate, red velvet, strawberry, and caramel. The groom’s cakes were displayed on the foyer’s sideboard, which was accented with hypericum berries and candles. The cakes were featured on three pearl-edged silver pedestals. In the center was a two-tiered fudge-covered butter cake, each tier having 18 layers. Tiramisu, the groom’s personal favorite, was on either side and was skirted with a wide satin latte ribbon, similar to the sash on the bride’s gown. Varieties of grapes provided an elegant drape of color to the groom’s cake buffet. Homemade peach ice cream was served with the cakes. Amy Perryman of Hartsfield, created the confections.
Guest tables throughout the club were covered with sage satin cloths overlaid with crisp white linen hem-stitched squares. Trumpet vases of snapdragons, blue and white hydrangeas, white garden roses, orchids, bells of Ireland, and green hanging amaranthus with natural branches holding hanging votive candles were placed on alternating tables.
Mercury glass bowls and mint julep cups holding similar flowers were used with votive candles on other tables. The white tent on the golf course green was flanked with guilded bird cages filled with hydrangeas, roses, snapdragons, and bells of Ireland. Twin orbs of blue and white hydrangeas and roses were hung from black wrought iron chandeliers.
Large stone urns filled with native green foliages were used throughout the party area.
Silver trays of hors d’oeuvres and canapés were passed by the staff of Sue Cox and Covington’s as guests arrived. Two large crescent-shaped displays for the dinner buffet were in the dining room, and another was placed outside on the lawn under the tent, where additional seating was provided to accommodate guests. The buffet tables were draped with ivory damask skirting and pistachio satin overlays and large floral arrangements similar to those on the guest tables. Dinner was served from large silver epergnes and other decorative silver pieces.
Guests were entertained by and danced to the music of AzIzz of Atlanta, Ga. They also enjoyed recording memories of the evening in a Photo Booth.
Flowers by Barrett created the artistic floral designs. Mrs. Ed F. Willis and Mrs. Davis A. Dunaway directed the wedding and evening’s events.
On the eve of the wedding, the bridegroom’s parents hosted a New York City themed formal, seated rehearsal dinner, at the Colquitt County Arts Center.
Following a wedding trip to the Napa Valley and San Francisco, Mr. and Mrs. Houchins are at home in New York City.